Cuteness and Memes in Wildflower Cafe Slideshow

Start Your World Vegan Month at Wildflower Vegan Cafe

What’s Up? Enjoy cake and a cup of fair-trade coffee or a hearty vegan meal at Wildflower on the first Saturday in November, when I’ll facilitate a slideshow and conversation on Cuteness and Memes in Animal Advocacy.

Where? Wildflower Vegan Cafe, Village on High, Millville, NJ.  856.265.7955

When? 4 pm on Saturday 5 November 2016

We’ve all seen “Why love one but eat the other” images. Indeed, why do we love a puppy yet have no regrets when it comes to eating the calf? Then again…

Does setting the ideal in “loving” animals compromise nonhuman dignity? What can other social movements teach us about these idealized images?

Eric Nyman, owner of Wildflower Vegan Café, said, “Our business is nurturing bodies and minds. We’re excited to open November, which has traditionally been World Vegan Month, by offering space for Lee’s work on memes—inviting advocates and the public to consider how feel-good imagery might endorse exploitation.”

Event sponsored by Wildflower Vegan Café, and patrons of the art of animal liberation.

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Vegstock: A Moving Vegan Festival

Vegstock: A Moving Vegan Festival is a concept developed by Eric Nyman of Wildflower, a restaurant in southern New Jersey. There’s an ethical oomph when the word vegan appears in a festival name, and Eric set out to make ethics central to the first South Jersey vegan festival, which will span a portion of a street in Millville, host cooking demos, and collaborate with a number of businesses along the same street.

When asked to speak I said: Count me in. I teach environmental law; I write law review articles about advocacy, bio-communities, and climate change. Yet here is Wildflower, offering a super-accessible educational opportunity related to some of these same topics.

People need no advanced degrees to understand how we got this human-dominated, climate-compromised planet, and how to live differently. But we do need ways to focus our attention and exchange ideas and inspiration locally. What kind of Saturday could be more enjoyably worthwhile than this? What’s cooler than a vegetable restaurant dedicating itself to the cultivation of community? And the inclusion of artists, chefs and events throughout the day in various local spots in the Glasstown Arts District’s High Street makes it uniquely exciting.

Before I go, I want to put three nutshells on Vegan Place describing the topics I’ll open at Vegstock this Saturday.

The impacts of `free-range` on the free-living. For years, animal advocates have operated under the belief that pasture-based or organic ranching, while not perfect, represents a step in the humane direction—but only looking at how domesticated animals seem to be affected. The best case scenario for achieving an advocacy victory involves the business that agrees to “give” the animals space and conditions that the advocates deem “natural” for the animals.

A general return to the family farm is implausible on an Earth with 7-billion-plus humans. And the more of Earth’s finite space and resources “given” to our domesticated animals, the less is available to communities of undomesticated animals who live in their own spaces, on their own terms.

The weight (mass) of the cows we breed to consume adds up to more than that of all free-living land mammals combined. Does it make any ethical sense to say we’re doing the most good when we focus on improving animal husbandry? Is it fair and accurate to claim more space or “natural” conditions for farm-raised animals constitute some form of animal rights or “a step in the right direction”?

I’ll also bring marine animals into the discussion, and the roles of the World Wildlife Fund and Greenpeace in assuring people that “sustainable seafood” exists while promoting the international commerce in fish raised on the mass corn and soy markets.

The current climate situation and the importance of dietary divestment from animal agribusiness. Halve your intake of animal flesh, and you could cut your carbon footprint by more than 35%, current research shows. Go vegan, and the difference could be 60%.

How important is commitment to veganism? Notice what climate change is doing to our planet and our prospects for living on it, for one thing. Overall, because of global warming, the planet could see about an 11% reduction in the number of days with suitable climates for plant growth, with some tropical regions facing a reduction of up to 200 days per year by 2100. That’s frightening stuff. If there ever was a time for half-measures, that time is over.

Internet memes in a social movement. This is going to be the hardest to do, as it’s an AV presentation addressing issues of sex, race, and class as well as other-than-human interests, and it’s important to do it without misappropriating perspectives and circumstances even as it explores them.

Is it respectful to rely on graphic images of beings whose lives we don’t know, of individuals who cannot give us permission, in order to make social statements?

Does the regular picturing of abuse prevent us from appropriately processing “adorable” interactions and “cute” Internet memes? Is it vulnerability we are often looking at when we look at these? Is it a vulnerability of our own making?

Overall, the impact of social media on knowledge-sharing can’t be denied. Listicles, buzzwords and memes (oh, my!) are ever-present for the half of the human population with access to a computer. How are we affected by the built-in convenience of these communication devices—whether as receivers or communicators?

I do not know if any of the above segments will be taped, though Eric Nyman has put a call out for someone with AV gear to handle that. If you’re reading and planning to attend, I hope you’ll let me know of any specific aspect of the above you’d find especially interesting, or something relevant that I might have overlooked.


Vegstock Moving Vegan Festival

Sat 12 September, 11 AM · Hosted by Wildflower earthly vegan fare · Millville, NJ